PROGRAM TYPE
On Campus

DEGREES
BA

Contact

James Bidwell, Ph.D.

Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
School of Liberal Arts and Sciences
(508) 849-3267
Academic AgreementsAccelerated Degree ProgramGen Ed CurriculumHonors ProgramStudy Abroad5th Year Masters

Law, Justice, and Society

Program Overview

The Law, Justice, and Society (LJS) Program offers an interdisciplinary study of law that incorporates several disciplines in the social sciences, including Criminal Justice, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology.  The LJS program is particularly interdisciplinary as the faculty hold graduate degrees in the fields of Education, Law, Political Science, and Psychology.  The major allows students (with faculty guidance) to customize it to suit their particular needs and interests.  Faculty employ an array of active learning techniques to further enhance the student experience. such as debates, presentations, mock trials, and simulations.

The LJS Program examines the interrelatedness of law, society, and politics with an overarching concern for justice. The program’s objectives are fully consistent with the skills and knowledge that the American Bar Foundation has recommended for success in law school and provides a strong foundation for students whether you are headed to law school, graduate school in the social sciences, or a career in advocacy, business, communication, criminal justice, education, government, human relations, journalism, law, law enforcement, nonprofit and/or international organizations, politics, public administration, social service, and other public service.

 

More Information

Course of Study
Meet Our Faculty
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Course Of Study

Minor

Information Coming Soon

Curriculum Map

Law, Justice and Society Major Requirements
Course Number Course Name Semester Completed
LJS 100 Introduction to Law Year 1 – Fall
PSC 151 Contemporary Politics and Culture – from WWII to 9/11 Year 1 – Spring
PSC 231 American Government Year 2 – Fall
LJS 200 Introduction to Conflict Resolution Year 2 – Fall
PSC 201 Introduction to Politics Year 2 – Spring
LJS 255 Philosophy of Law Year 2 – Spring
LJS 322 Law, Justice and Society Year 3 – Fall
LJS 300 What is Justice Year 3 – Spring
LJS 490 Senior Seminar in Law, Justice and Society Year 4
Politics Cluster (take one or more) LJS 211  Global Studies through Film

PSC 307 American Foreign Policy

PSC 320 International  Relations

PSC 330 Politics of Terrorism

PSC 390 Post Conflict Justice

Year 3 or 4
Justice Cluster (take one or more) LJS/CRJ 309 Genocide Studies

LJS/CRJ 321 Gender, Crime, and Justice

LJS/CRJ 323 Race and Justice

LJS 307   Contemporary Issues in Law, Justice and Society

LJS 444  Law, Social Science and Social Issues Seminar

LJS 3/2xx Environmental Justice

Year 3 or 4
Law Cluster (take one or more) CRJ 210 Constitutional Law

CRJ 212 Criminal Law

LJS 250 American Legal History

LJS 302 Trial Practice

LJS 310 Juvenile Law

Year 3 or 4
Open electives LJS 499 Internship Year 4

 

  • CURRICULUM MAP FOR LAW, JUSTICE AND SOCIETY MAJORS:
Fall Spring
Freshman LJS 100 – Introduction to Law PSC 151 – Contemporary Politics and Culture
Sophomore PSC 231 – Introduction to American Government

LJS 200 – Introduction to Conflict Resolution

LJS 255 – Philosophy of Law

PSC 201 – Introduction to Politics

Junior LJS 322 – Law, Justice and Society;

Upper-level elective

LJS 300 – What is Justice?

Upper-level elective

Senior Washington Center Internship Program or

LJS 499 Internship (recommended)

LJS 490 – Senior Seminar in Law, Justice and Society

Two upper-level electives

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. To develop a multi-disciplinary understanding of various theoretical and empirical perspectives on law, legal and political change, and the relationship between law, politics, and society.
  2. To demonstrate understanding of the development of law, politics, and society in the United States and the world with an appreciation of the increasing interdependence of countries and international institutions.
  3. To develop your critical thinking and written and oral communication skills to be able to express informed opinions and sustained arguments about issues in law, equality and justice, and to meaningfully engage in dialogue with others of differing perspectives to develop a synthesis and resolution of those divergent perspectives.
  4. To initiate, develop, and present independent research addressing and analyzing the relationship between law, politics, and society.

Meet Our Faculty

Seth Racusen, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Criminal Justice
(508) 849-3373

Dianne White, M.A.,J.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Criminal Justice
(508) 849-3417