Spring 2021 Virtual Academic Symposium

Welcome to the Anna Maria College 2021 Academic Symposium! Held every spring, the Symposium provides a platform for the College to highlight the amazing work generated by our talented students and faculty. Normally this event would be held in person, but in an effort to protect our community and adhere to CDC guidelines, this year’s presentations have been recorded. The presentations vary in length because we wanted to honor the same format used as the in-person symposiums; however, poster and oral presentations have been excluded in this virtual format. As you peruse the presentations created by students and faculty from a variety of disciplines, we hope you are as proud as we are of incredible work they have done.

Student Presentations

Charles Whitman Case Study
Multi-Crisis Concern: Effects on Child Welfare and Mental Health During the Pandemic
Communication and Prevention of Lateral Violence
Best Practices to Reduce Falls in Elderly Clients in a Hospital Setting
A Crisis in a Crisis: Domestic Violence and COVID-19
Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections
Increasing Medication Safety for Pediatric Patients
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
Attitudes of Social Work Students and Social Workers Towards Transracial Adoption
The Self-Perception of a Student Attending an Alternative School
The Bright Side: Benefits of Support System for Children
Improving Medication Safety in the Clinical Setting
The Effects of the Pandemic on Early Childhood Development
Skin to Skin Contact
Maternal Substance Use
Screening For Infectious Diseases In Correctional Settings
Nurses and/or Interdisciplinary Team Measures to Promote Elders Living Safely in Their Homes
Burnout During the Pandemic
The Effects of Witnessing the Resuscitation of a Family Member
COVID-19 and Mental Health in College Students
Music Therapy at UMass Memorial Children’s Medical Center
Cultural Awareness and Complementary Traditional Medicine
Wholistic Wellness
How Well-Being Relates to Career Engagement of Emerging Adult College Seniors
COVID-19’s Impact on Our Most Vulnerable Minds
Exercise During Pregnancy
Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-based Paper: Reducing Incidence of Shaken Baby Syndrome
Best Practice to Reduce Pressure Ulcers
Comparison of Campus Climate Perceptions Between LGBTQ+ Students and Heterosexual Cisgender Students Attending a Catholic College
Risk Factors for Healthcare Associated Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU’s)
The Pandemics Impact on Inmate Mental Health
Effects of the Pandemic on Mental Health for First Responders
Cobedding Twins
The Effectiveness of Music Therapy on Cancer Patients
Female Engagement in True Crime Media and its Effects On Mental Health
Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Infections (CAUTIs)
Industrial Psychology Effects During COVID-19
Reducing Medical Errors in a Hospital Setting: Nurse to Patient Ratios
The Impact of Residential Placement on Male Adolescents’ Academic Progress
Diabetes and Pregnancy
Preventing Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in ICU
Increased Anxiety Surrounding the COVID-19 Pandemic
Frontline Workers: Nurses During COVID
Loneliness and Drug Use Disorder
The Role of Mothers and Fathers in the Career Development of College Seniors in the U.S.
Relationship Between Spirituality and Depression
Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Addressing Elder Abuse
A Gentleman Needs No Introduction: How Robin Hood’s Peasantry Leads to Chivalry
Robin Hood: The Noble Thief’s Translation to Modern Media
Best Practice for Pain Management During End of Life Care
How To Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) at Home
Addiction in a Pandemic
Best Evidence-based Practice to Reduce Stress/Burnout in Oncology Nurses
Steps to Help You Make an Easy Transition into Practicum
Comorbidity between Mental Health and Addiction Treatment
Substance Abuse and Childhood Development
Nurse Fatigue
Teenage Pregnancy Between 13-19 Years Old
Best Practice to Reduce the Incidence of Medication Errors
Effects of The COVID-19 Pandemic in School Surrounding Special Needs Adolescence
Child Trauma and Adult Anxiety Disorder
Child Abuse and Poverty
The Effects of Prevention Programs on Early Onset of Substance Abuse in Adolescents
Art and Other Alternative Therapies for Parkinson’s Patients
Stress Among College Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Habit Magazine Showcase
Student Teaching in a Global Pandemic
Doll Therapy Approach to Alzheimer’s Disease
Affects of Alcoholism on Children during the Pandemic

Faculty Presenters

Increasing Awareness of Occupational Health Nursing in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs

By: Karin Ciance

Teaching Reimagined: How This Pandemic Will Reshape Education

By: Reagan Paras

Beauty and the Liberal Arts

By: Marc Tumeinski

A New way of Seeing

By: David Wackell

Momoyama Sanpo: An Abiding Mystery Resolves

By: David Wackell

Student Presenters

Charles Whitman Case Study

By: Richard Amsel

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Charles Joseph Whitman is infamous as the 1966 “Texas Tower Sniper” at the University of Texas in Austin.  In this case study, the researcher applied three different criminological theories to identify the motive behind Whitman’s crime.  These theories were General Strain Theory, Family Deviance Theory, and Behavioral Theory.  Biological factors and environmental factors were also explored to determine whether Whitman was “an evil person” or “the victim of a broken criminal justice system”.  This researcher argues that Whitman is the latter.  Three key pieces of data support this argument: 1) Whitman grew up in an abusive household, 2) exposure to trauma while in the Marine Corps, and 3) the discovery of a brain tumor upon autopsy.  This presentation will conclude why an otherwise nonviolent man committed such a horrible act. 

Multi-Crisis Concern: Affects on Child Welfare and Mental Health During the Pandemic

By: Maria Anziani and Amaya White

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Children are widely recognized as a vulnerable population; their welfare and mental health should be of top priority. Child abuse and neglect has been a concern and is now growing due to the uncertainty of their wellbeing during this global pandemic. Due to stay-in-place laws and being out of view from mandated reporters, there can be an unknown surge of abuse and neglect.Covid-19 has created an abundance of stressors including financial stress, disrupted routines, lack of resources and community support. At the same time, physical distancing has restricted contact between children and the protective adults within public settings, who most commonly report cases of suspected child maltreatment. Child maltreatment continues to be a major health and social welfare problem across the globe. In theUnited States, millions of children from all socioeconomic backgrounds across all ages, religions, and cultures are victims of child maltreatment every day and millions are more at risk.This project will demonstrate the long-lasting impact on the child and their families.The studies and reports demonstrated will emphasize how the situations were constructed and the impact it has made. This project will focus on the awareness of environmental stressors that cause child maltreatment.

Communication and Prevention of Lateral Violence

By: Elyse Baillargeon

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Through research, the topic of horizontal violence, is something that is highly looked over in many healthcare facilities. Through effective communication and education nurses and their care teams will have a better understanding and hopefully will decrease the amount of times adverse events happen. Effective communication is the best way to have positive outcomes for patient care. When nurses are not treated each with respect then that interferes with the patient care. Using tools such as SBAR and structured joint huddles can decrease the amount of stress on the nurse because their performance will better, knowing the team is on the same page. As research suggests that stress was one of the main reason’s nurses had “workplace bullying”. Alleviating the stress by using these tools can increase nursing care, but also nurse to nurse relationships, because the communication and structure is there. 

Best Practices to Reduce Falls in Elderly Clients in a Hospital Setting

By: Rose Bellahalea

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This clinical Evidenced-Based Practice Problem examined the best practices to reduce falls in elder clients in a hospital setting. To identify best practices for this clinical issue, 5 evidence-based literature articles published within the last 5 years was reviewed. These literature review revealed that, knowing the patients who are at risks of falling will aid the nurse to know what preventive measures to put in place. Nurses routinely assess hospitalized patients’ risk for falls and educate patients on preventing falls. It is important to assess the perceptions related to falls and fall prevention among hospitalized adults. Nurses felt that the use of a Wireless Modular Bed Absence Sensor Device was effective in preventing falls and found the device easy to use and were willing to use the device in the future. The best current evidence, is assessing patients who are at risk for fall during admission, putting them on fall precautions; with the use of bed/chair alarms. It is the nurse’s goal to provide safe, and patient centered care for every patient. The findings of this research provide a means for nurses to identify best evidence-based practices to use to improve the quality of care given to patients.

A Crisis in a Crisis: Domestic Violence and COVID-19

By: Sarah Benites

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Domestic violence has continued to plague society throughout the entirety of history. Great strides have been made in protecting women experiencing abuse through the creation of laws and services, but the coronavirus pandemic is jeopardizing such advancements. While the disease itself has proved disastrous, it has also proved to greatly exacerbate issues, including the issue of Intimate Parter Violence (IPV), leaving the safety of such individuals suffering from this form of violence at risk. The lockdown that resulted from the pandemic further isolated victims of domestic violence increasing the difficulty for such individuals to receive help. Isolation poses a grave danger to those with abusive partners as it allows for the abuser to assert greater control over the victim. The stress caused by the pandemic can worsen the abuse as the abuser will likely take such stress out on their victim. Studies conducted in other countries in which are beginning to return to normalcy show that the number of individuals, specifically women, experiencing abuse at the hands of their partner has greatly increased. Statistics from police departments and domestic violence helplines have also shown this trend to be occurring in the United States as well as abroad. This project will work to explore the effects of the pandemic on Intimate Partner Violence, focusing specifically on female victims, through empirical and statistical evidence as well as potential services or policies that should be implemented upon the return of normalcy to assist these individuals.

Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections

By: Tyler Benjamin

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Central line-associated Bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are one of the most common types of healthcare-acquired infections (HAI). These infections account for 14% of all HAI and are detrimental to the health care system. The risk it brings to our patient’s safety and health care system as they result in high mortality rates at a high cost (Conley, 2016; ODPHP, 2020). The US Department of Health and Human Services created a plan to reduce CLABSI by 50% in all clinical settings which is part of their national plan to reduce all HAIs (Emery, Jameson, Jack, 2016). Best practices have shown that the central line bundle, when implemented together, has the best outcomes. The central line bundle includes five key components which include hand hygiene, barrier precautions, chlorhexidine skin antisepsis, optimal catheter site selection (avoidance of femoral vein for adult patients), and daily monitoring of central line and removing unnecessary central lines (Emery, Jameson, Jack, 2016, Williams, 2015, Conley, 2016). Over 15 months, the University of Colorado Health-Memorial Hospital was able to achieve its goal of zero CLABSI in their ICU after implementation of the CL bundle along with staff education (Emery, Jameson, Jack, 2016). Before this implementation, their infection rate was 1.9 per 1000 catheter days

Increasing Medication Safety for Pediatric Patients

By: Kaylee Besse

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This presentation investigates the causes of medication errors in pediatric patients and what changes can be implemented to reduce their occurrence. Through analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research studies, this paper lays out nurses’ perceptions for causes of errors and statistics for medication errors observed in pediatric and neonatal settings. The identified causes in this paper include prescription errors, staffing ratios, night shift, and the special care required for pediatric nursing that is not applicable when caring for adults. After discussing these causes for error, this paper recommends best practices to reduce error based on the evidence in the referenced research reports. To minimize prescription errors, best practice is the use of Computerized Physician Order Entry. To reduce error during night shift, administration should seek to improve the quality of sleep that night shift nurses get. Administration also needs to ensure safe staffing ratios so that nurses may give the care and attention they need to their patients and maintain their safety.  

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

By: Miriam Boaheng

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper will examine the best possible way to care for newborns with opioid addiction. It will explore current treatments and how they should be improved. It will also mention nurses’ thoughts and roles, as they are the primary caregivers of these babies during this time. All articles used in this Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper, are five years relevant and peer-reviewed by a registered nurse. After a review of an article, it was revealed that mothers with sick babies often felt judges and not included in the plan of care. Researchers sample 20 mothers that recently gave birth. Interviews were conducted on the phone right after discharge or in person before discharge.  Mothers did not feel welcomed by nurses and wanted more interaction with the nurses. The best way to improve the care of newborns passively addicted to an opioid is to include family in the child’s plan of care. The child will be discharged to the mother. The mother should be able to know what is going on with her child so she can care for her child. When the child and mother are home, the mother can adequately care for her baby. Essentially improving the care babies addicted to an opioid get. 

Attitudes of Social Work Students and Social Workers Towards Transracial Adoption

By: Carli Boudreau

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Despite being a controversial topic, transracial adoption has never been deemed constitutional or unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. The Multi-Ethnic Placement Act has made efforts to address transracial adoptions, but it only addresses the matching of race between children and adoptive families. Research related to transracial adoption is critical to solving the over-representation of minority children in foster care and in need of adoption, but it is sparse. This research will shed light on a controversial issue through the eyes of those on the front lines: social workers and social work students. This study will explore the question: “What are the attitudes of social work students and social workers toward transracial adoption?” Given the social justice aspect of social work, it is hypothesized that social work students and child protection social workers will display positive attitudes toward transracial adoption.  

The Self-Perception of a Student Attending an Alternative School

By: Cassparina Breen

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Children who have had exposure to family violence, such as witnessing abuse, or experiencing abuse and neglect have a harder time learning in a conventional school setting. The impact of trauma on a child’s self-perception and worldview follows them into the classroom; it interferes with their ability to process information and maintain control over their behaviors and emotions. Alternative schools offer flexibility, practice self-regulation, and are surrounded by support systems. How social workers and teachers respond to children with trauma will greatly impact their education and self-perception. The purpose of this research is to examine a student’s self-perception when attending an alternative school in a therapeutic setting. 

The Bright Side: Benefits of Support System for Children

By: Michael Burke

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Throughout the pandemic, we have constantly heard the negative aspects of being locked down during this difficult time. Obviously, children’s mental health has been negatively challenged because they are in the house all the time but why is no one talking about how the shutdown could positively have an impact them? I believe that an important component in terms of child development is their support system. For my presentation I discussed how important a child’s support system is during this difficult time unlike anything we have seen. I have heard stories of parents finding spontaneous ways to teach, empower, and to uplift their children during this crazy time. I find that we tend to lean on the negative side of things when things aren’t going well but that doesn’t mean that we can’t add some perspective and look at the positive side of the spectrum. 

Improving Medication Safety in the Clinical Setting

By: Lauren Burns

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This clinical practice problem presentation looked at implementations that facilities may put into place to prevent medication administration errors in the clinical setting. The problem was that medication administration errors were occurring due to nurses being interrupted during the process. Several studies done in the past five years have revealed that certain interventions have been effective in lowering the number of medication administration errors that occur in hospitals. Studies were done with mostly convenience samples of nurses who agreed to be observed or submit surveys about the medication administration process. Interventions such as a red light, vests, and signs put up in the hospital were implemented to examine the impact they had on decreasing distractions to nurses while they were administering medication. The studies concluded that the interventions done during the studies should be kept because they were able to decrease the number of errors that happened. A possible implication of this research is that all facilities may have an implementation to prevent medication administration errors.  

The Effects of the Pandemic on Early Childhood Development

By: Brenna Champy

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Everyone has been effected by the pandemic in one way or another, there’s no doubt about that. The question that we should now be concerned about, is what will the lasting effects be on the youngest members of todays society? The everyday routines that families try so hard to get everyone into, disrupted and replaced by zoom meetings and grocery deliveries. Some might say that this pandemic has brought more quality time to families and given them more chances to spend time together, that previously would have spent been doing things outside the home. When people think of what a child is taught in school, they usually jump to the basics; reading, writing, math and science. However, school is so much more than things a teacher brings to the classroom with a book.

In March 2020, children were pulled from their classrooms and forced to adapt to online learning, with the only physical help being their parents or caregivers. Not only did this change effect the children being taught, it forced teachers to learn a whole new style of teaching, proving to be very difficult for both sides. As the pandemic continued, some parents switched to working remotely from home, some continued their normal work weeks, and some unfortunately lost their job. This presentation will focus on the negative effects of the pandemic how that will shape a child’s entire development, big and small.

Skin to Skin Contact

By: Sadie DeBoer

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Skin to skin contact post vaginal birth is becoming a common occurrence in many hospitals. The criteria for the most beneficial skin to skin contact experience involves a healthy mother and infant. There are many benefits for not only the infant but also the mother when the choice of skin to skin contact is made. Infants can receive physical and emotional benefits such as thermal regulation, a growing bond with their mother, the ability to regulate their breathing pattern, and many neurological advances. The mother is able to achieve a simple breast-feeding experience and is also able to have their hormones regulated through the direct touch of their newborn. Health care professionals who work directly with the mothers and infants are able to give their input on what helps both parties and what limits the effectiveness of direct skin to skin contact. They are also able to give recommendations as to how the process can be altered to obtain the most benefits for the mother and the infant. These specific health care workers were interviewed individually to obtain the aspect of what each of them was able to recognize within their own scopes of practice.  

Maternal Substance Use

By: Mia DiBiasio

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This clinical practice problem evidenced-based paper demonstrates the importance of providing care for maternal substance use. A review of the current evidence-based literature was executed to identify the best techniques when caring for opioid-dependent pregnant women. The opioid epidemic is an ongoing issue and the statistics showed a significant increase in maternal substance use. Many nurses and other health care professionals lack both the knowledge and experience when providing care for women. As this problem continues to grow, nurses should be educated on different methods to provide care meeting all the aspects of the mother. This evidence-based paper outlines several different practices that can be incorporated into patient care. The best practices to achieve this goal consists of screening, education, developing a nurse-patient therapeutic relationship, and maintenance therapy.

Screening For Infectious Diseases In Correctional Settings

By: Sophea Diep

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The clinical practice problem evidence-based paper explores the benefits of screening for infectious diseases during incarceration. With screening, it can provide knowledge regarding treatment of the disease, that they did not know they had, and it can also provide knowledge regarding how to prevent inmates from spreading it.

Nurses and/or Interdisciplinary Team Measures to Promote Elders Living Safely in Their Homes

By: Kiera Draney

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The research explored in this Clinical Practice Problem Evidence Based paper is to help improve safety in elderly patients’ homes. Thousands of falls among the elderly happen yearly, but with the proper teaching, we can improve safety in the home to avoid falls that are preventable. This paper includes five studies that were performed to gather data about which common items in the home increase the risk of falls. One question to think about is how can we make homes safer for the elderly population? The researched shows that almost half of the elderly population fall each year, with almost half of the falls resulting in serious injuries and/or hospitalization (Sirohi,2017). This research will provide nurses with the information they need to improve their educational teaching of home safety to patients. The studies participants consisted of elderly patients aging 60 and older. The studies used included quantitative and qualitative studies to try and get as much information as possible. By looking over the studies, nurses are able to build on their personal knowledge of the topic, along with providing patients with more knowledge.

Burnout During the Pandemic

By: Alexandra Faucher

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Working remotely or in your normal work place during this pandemic is not an easy task. Under the pandemic, those who are struggling with burnout are often overseen. According to recently published data, burnout symptoms are seen among people in many different domains of society ranging from health care workers to teachers adjusting their role. Literature showed that this pandemic has caused a great transition for people and it has exhausted their energy level and has affected those around them. Using recently published articles, this study examines the burnout levels and symptoms as well as how the burnout affects people at work and home.

The Effects of Witnessing the Resuscitation of a Family Member

By: Amber Floury

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This presentation focuses on the effects of witnessing the resuscitation of a family member, based on evidence-based, peer reviewed, literature that was published within the last five years. There were a total of about 6 articles that fit the criteria for the study. The studies showed that there were different attitudes (positive, negative, and neutral) about the subject. This presentation focuses on the positive and negative outcomes for the family and/or the patient.

COVID-19 and Mental Health in College Students

By: Sakina Fundi

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College life has always been incredibly stressful because there is a transition between high school and college where the student goes from living care-free under the supervision of their parents to fully providing for themselves while also focusing on schoolwork. This transition could be challenging to many students’ mental health. Furthermore, according to recent research, the COVID-19 pandemic has raised issues among the number of students in relation to depression and anxiety. With all the issues that come together with the pandemic, the government and educational institutions have found remote learning as an alternative. Unfortunately, data show that this method of teaching could be associated with poor student mental health and education. This study examines the association between academic performance and Covid-19 and the impact that Covid-19 has on the mental health of college students. This study uses published articles to answer the question.

Music Therapy at UMass Memorial Children's Medical Center

By: Camryn Gallagher

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Originally created for UMass Medical School students, this presentation outlines the philosophy of music therapy within UMass Memorial Children’s Medical Center in Worcester, MA. Music therapy intern Cammy Gallagher explores the typical clinical goals addressed and interventions used in this setting, featuring real examples of patient work. Viewers will gain insight on this example of what music therapy looks like in our community.

Cultural Awareness and Complementary Traditional Medicine

By: Sara Gallant

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Healthy People 2020, the Institute of Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and the United States Department of Health and Human Services under the Executive Order 13166, to name a few, all have one thing in common. They each aim to improve universal civil rights in health care by 2020.  They will do this by focusing on eliminating disparity due to race and ethnicity, increasing the available services for all people with limited English proficiency, and diversifying the medical approach by imposing new legal regulations (McGowan, Lee, Meneses, Perkins, & Youdelman, 2015). To complete this task with precision and care, one aspect that must not be ignored is cultural tradition. In our contemporary medical system in America, one of the most diverse nations in the world, at times, we inadvertently discredit and even disrespect the heritage of individuals by depriving them of their right to use their most trusted ancient remedies in conjunction with allopathic care (Egede, 2006). There is a hard line between complementary traditional and Western medicine.  They appear to be in an invisible battle against each other when an eventual need for a fusion is inevitable.  New bills have been presented to congress annually since 1989 regarding CAM therapies, debating insurance coverage and imposition of guidelines that may help to coincide with medical treatments (Georgetown Law Library, 2021).  With more evidence about interactions being attained from in-depth clinical research, it is possible to safely integrate certain pharmaceuticals with ethnic food, energy, and herbal therapies. Statistical analysis reveals that approximately 20% of United States residents use some type of home remedy and 70% admit not disclosing this information with their doctor. If we don’t learn more or open our minds to our patients, we perpetuate the possibility of dangerous medicine interactions (Brantley, Argikar, Lin, Nagar, & Paine, 2007).  The most commonly known herb-drug contraindications are with the spices garlic, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, and cayenne or chili, which also happen to be abundantly used in cuisine, internationally (Williamson, Driver, & Baxter, 2009). During the clinical intake, nurses and doctors may ask what medicines and supplements a patient is taking but the question that medical practitioners never think to ask is what type of spices do you cook with? This should be a standard inquisition. The most recent US Census Bureau report states that 13.7% of people living in America are foreign-born and another 8% are limited in English proficiency (Zong & Batalova, 2015). It is our legal and ethical responsibility as healthcare practitioners to be 100% dedicated to cultural sensitivity and improving outcomes of communicating with people of limited English proficiency by 2020 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2014). It is not only our privilege to work amongst so many different types of people in this country, but also our legal obligation to become more in tune with the ancient traditions still kept alive within each culture so that we are holistically approaching the patient, honoring who they are, where they come from, and how that can help us to provide them with the best treatment possible. It is an oath we all took as nurses. Education on this topic could inspire much needed evolution in modern medical standards and inspire true diversity of care.  

Wholistic Wellness

By: Jessica Grindell

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This presentation will discuss the concerning rates of burnout among graduate students. Why are these rates so high? What contributes to them?  This research will discuss the signs and symptoms of burnout in addition to the importance of self-care.  A list of self-care activities will be provided that graduate and undergraduate students can do when they experience stress and burnout. 

How Well-Being Relates to Career Engagement of Emerging Adult College Seniors

By: Jessica Hanam

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Past studies on the topic of emerging adulthood, which can be thought of as individuals 18-29 years of age, and career engagement have shown that, during the transitional phase of emerging adulthood, individuals cycle through many different jobs that they find unsatisfying, while they embark on a journey to find a career that suits what they deem to be purposeful. Moreover, research has shown that those who are in this stage of life can appropriately engage in their career by setting goals, seeking out different job options, cycling out which options they find are feasible for them, adjusting goals as needed, and seeking out new opportunities as their career aspirations adjust. By doing so, emerging adults can begin to successfully work towards the career they find suits their wants, needs, and desires, while eventually finding a job that they truly find meets their needs, and thus, allows them to transition from emerging adulthood into young adulthood. However, it has also been shown that one’s wellbeing may play a role in their mental health, which can impact the way they behave, including behaviors such as career engagement. The purpose of this study is to examine the career engagement behaviors during a critical transition for college seniors as they transition out of college and understand its relationship with well-being indices. Quantitative responses of 288 college seniors in the U.S. will be analyzed to examine these relationships.

COVID-19's Impact on Our Most Vulnerable Minds

By: Jessica Hanam

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Research has shown several negative effects of COVID-19 on the mental health of long-term care residents. Specifically, long-term care residents have been subjected to social isolation to keep this vulnerable population safe from the dangerous, and potentially deadly consequences they face if they contract the COVID-19 virus. However, though this isolation was meant to keep these residents’ physical health in good standing, this social isolation has harmed their mental health in a variety of ways, including neurocognitive impairment, psychosis, and mood and anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study is to address the impact that social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic has had on long-term care residents. Additionally, the present study attempts to find a relationship between the social isolation long-term care residents have undergone and one’s mental health, such that those who were subjected to social isolation in long-term care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic are exhibiting greater levels of mental health issues, such as increased depression, increased anxiety, and a decline in their cognitive functioning. This paper seeks to address the negative mental health impact that social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic has on long-term care residents as expressed by past research, and the findings and implications of the current study. 

Exercise During Pregnancy

By: Madelyn Hill

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This research paper focuses on exercise during pregnancy and how it affects women’s health. This paper questions the effects of lack of exercise on the pregnant body and how much exercise is appropriate for pregnant women. Participants included in the project include pregnant women from first, second, and third trimesters, along with different ages, ethnicities, and body types. There are various methods used to obtain this research in every evidence-based article sourced in this paper through questionnaires, experiments, and meta-analysis reviews. Results vary; however all indicate that gestational diabetes is preventable and treatable with proper implementation. Moderate-intensity exercise is recommended to pregnant women to avoid complications throughout the entirety of their gestation. In conclusion, this research paper entails resourceful information pertaining to exercise during pregnancy and the significant practice problem of gestational diabetes.

Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-based Paper: Reducing Incidence of Shaken Baby Syndrome

By: Wasfa Jaffri

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Child Abuse is a global problem that presents in the form of physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, and emotional abuse. Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is one form of abuse that predominantly impacts neurological functioning, but it can also have multiple impacts on neurocognitive functioning.

The number of articles on SBS has significantly increased in recent years. This evidence-based research paper explores causes, effects, and possible ways to combat the issue of SBS. Various studies have been done in neonatal settings in different parts of the world to identify the factors contributing to and barriers affecting the occurrence of shaken baby syndrome. To support the clinical practice problem statement proposed in this research, study findings from several peer-reviewed evidence-based articles were incorporated in this paper. 

Study findings also addressed whether or SBS education played a significant role in spreading awareness of SBS, among caregivers, ways to reduce the incidence of shaking the baby, and providing knowledge about alternative methods to sooth a crying infant.  Some studies utilized different methods to assess the caregiver’s perception of SBS and how they dealt with a crying baby. Methods included web-based surveys, telephone interviews, questionnaires, etc. 

Best Practice to Reduce Pressure Ulcers

By: Stephanie Jimenez

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Pressure ulcer prevention is important in nursing care. These types of injuries can be prevented if proper precautions are taken and when there is a practice to follow with the best ways to prevent them. In this paper I discuss some of the best practice to reduce pressure ulcers in hospital settings. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods nurses and patients were interviewed and patients in a hospital setting were also used to help determine if some interventions were useful in their care. Through research it was found that guidelines, facilitators, education, pressure ulcer prevention bundles and following the core, care and cure approach are all ways to help prevent pressure ulcers as well as care for them. These will help nurses better care for clients at high risk for this type of injury as well as help educate the clients and their families on how to care and prevent them once out of the hospital.

Comparison of Campus Climate Perceptions Between LGBTQ+ Students and Heterosexual Cisgender Students Attending a Catholic College

By: Alicia Johnston

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Campus climate is perceived differently for all students and has implications on their academic, social, and general experience. Under campus climate there are various subsystems including classroom climate, social climate, team climate, and group climate. There are several attributing factors of campus climate that are unique to colleges that are founded on Catholic principles and tradition. These include, but are not limited to, the integration of Catholic faith in administrative policies, the level of acceptance of the LGBTQ+ community held by faculty and students, and the level of inclusive LGBTQ+ curriculum. This study examines these factors and their impact on the perceptions of campus climate on LGBTQ+ students in comparison to heterosexual and cisgender student perceptions who do not experience these additional factors. 

Using a thirty-question online survey, participants anonymously shared their experiences in the categories of academics, social supports, perception of LGBTQ+ acceptance on campus, and experiences of discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. The sample was comprised of eighty-two students; thirty-two identifying as LGBTQ+ and fifty identifying as heterosexual cisgender. Results showed LGBTQ+ participants held more overall negative perceptions than heterosexual cisgender participants. In addition, heterosexual cisgender participants responded that their campus supported LGBTQ+ students 11% more than what the LGBTQ+ participants answered in the same question. It is my hope that the presentation of these findings will encourage dialogue of administration and higher education professionals to evaluate campus climate perceptions for all students. 

Risk Factors for Healthcare Associated Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU's)

By: Yvonne Lamptey

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Healthcare – associated infections are one of the most prevalent complications associated with the hospitalization of neonates in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). This study undertaken to discover and describe risk factors that contribute to healthcare associated infections in infants in NICU’s. An exploration of five peered-reviewed articles were obtained through Google scholar and Cumulative Index to nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) search engines and analysis were made from their methods or research designs; quantitative(experimental), qualitative(interviews) and mixed methods, settings, sampling methods, data collection, data analysis and research findings. Research findings from all five peered-reviewed articles aimed at finding common risk factors that are associated to Healthcare- associated infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). The conclusions, describe risk factors from the use of complex diagnostic methods, multiple therapies for blood transfusions, surfactants, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), low birth weight (LBW), invasive mechanical devices, disparities in quality of care across diverse ethnicities, prematurity and Apgar score less then 7 in 5 minutes. 

The Pandemic's Impact on Inmate Mental Health

By: Marc LeBlanc

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A population whose mental health has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic is the inmate population.  As the pandemic hit many of the civilian workers that run programs such as substance abuse, GED/Hi-Set, and mental health were no longer able to have nearly the amount of access to the inmates as before.  Some weren’t even able to go into work for a period of time.  For the inmates, these civilian workers are people that help guide them through their time in incarceration and provide a source of comfort.  Once that is taken away then all of the stressors that didn’t seem as bad before begin to increase.  The importance of programs within jails and prisons is something that is underestimated by so many, and in light of the pandemic the lack of support for them has only increased.  As the pandemic begins to subside, the hope is that these programs will get back up and running to full capacity, or perhaps an even greater capacity.  What if the rehabilitation and reentry programs didn’t stop once the inmates walked out the door?  What if they had the option to be set up in a program that could teach them real-life skills that will help them earn a living while continuing to rehab whatever mental or substance abuse issues that they may be working through?  This could ensure that more inmates do successfully transition to life after incarceration which is something that could exponentially benefit society as a whole.

Effects of the Pandemic on Mental Health for First Responders

By: Judith LeDoux

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This project will focus on mental health for first responders, comparing and contrasting pre-pandemic and current aspects of mental health issues during the pandemic.  It will focus primarily on emergency medical services, including management and field staff.  This project will also explore potential long- and short-term effects of the pandemic on mental health for emergency medical service personnel.

Cobedding Twins

By: Alexandra Lewandowski

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This clinical practice problem evidence-based practice paper explored the risks and benefits of cobedding twins in both a hospital and home setting. A review of relevant evidence-based literature published within the last five years was conducted to address if cobedding is the best practice for twins in regard to coregulation, infant state, and safety. Methods used to determine this was firsthand observations and surveys given to the parents of twins. The studies concluded that while the twins slept better and cried less when cobedded, there was no significant difference in their coregulation and health. The overall consensus was a need for more research on this topic to make a definitive decision on whether or not this is the best practice for twins.

The Effectiveness of Music Therapy on Cancer Patients

By: Stephanie LoCascio

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper explored the best practice to incorporate complementary and alternative health practices into client care. More specifically, this paper presented and evaluated the effectiveness of music therapy in reducing pain and anxiety levels in cancer patients. Patients who are suffering from cancer experience significant levels of pain and anxiety that can severely decrease their quality of life. The use of non-pharmacologic therapies such as music therapy allows a nurse to reduce the amount of pain and anxiety cancer patients experience. The majority of studies investigating music therapy are completed in the same manner. To begin the experiment, data is collected in terms of each patient’s vital signs, pain scores, and anxiety levels. Then the intervention group is given their means of listening to music, and the control group continues as they ordinarily do. After the completion of music therapy (the intervention), the same data is collected again. The data produced by these studies suggest that music therapy reduces the pain and anxiety levels experienced by cancer patients. Researchers believe future studies concerning this approach should use larger groups of patients. Another limitation is that it is hard for researchers to find and include patients with the same type and stage of cancer. To conclude, implementing music therapy for patients who are experiencing pain and anxiety has been proven successful and is highly recommended.

Female Engagement in True Crime Media and its Effects On Mental Health

By: Kaitlyn Magner

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Research has shown that the majority of true crime audience is women. These findings from research led to wondering why women are motivated to engage with true crime media versus other forms of media, and how  true crime affects their mental health. This research focuses on the motivations behind why women engage with true crime media, and how engaging with true crime media affects their mental health in the short term. Using an exploratory design, a national survey was distributed through social media. A total of 439 participants responded. The data analysis shows that the hypothesis was confirmed that moderate or occasional use of true crime media showed neutral changes in mental health, whereas respondents who consumed often reported negative effects of mental health. This means that although true crime media does not have effects on mental health when consumed in moderation, when true crime media is consumed often, women may find negative mental health effects due to overconsumption. Respondents who reported consuming true crime often reported that they took a break from true crime media until their mental health improved or supplemented their true crime consumption with more uplifting or comedic forms of media. This means that there is a correlation between true crime consumption, specifically consuming true crime ‘often’ and negative mental health effects. A helpful coping skill given this finding would be to supplement positive or uplifting forms of media to negate any observed changes in mental health after engaging with true crime. 

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Infections (CAUTIs)

By: Raissa Mapinduzi

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A catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is one of the most common infections a person can contract in the hospital. The most important risk factor for developing a catheter-associated urinary tract infection(CAUTI) is prolonged use of the urinary catheter(CDC, 2015).The aim of this research paper was to explore different methods implemented in different settings to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). Five peer reviewed articles from the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) search through Anna Maria College library database were collected and compared in their sampling, data collection, findings, and interventions. All the research studies aimed at reducing the Catheter-associated urinary tract infection in different hospital settings.

Industrial Psychology Effects During COVID-19

By: Christine Martin

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This presentation will look at how covid-19 has impacted the industrial psychology field. The pandemic has changed the ways industrial psychologists do their jobs to help organizations and employees meet their goals. Industrial psychology is defined at the beginning to ensure the audience knows what this area of psychology studies. The presentation compares Anna Maria College and Fallon Health’s challenges they have faced during the pandemic for their employees since they are different size organizations. The human resources department created a wellness survey where the results are discussed as well as a sample question to show what the questions were aiming to ask. This presentation also looks at external stressors of employees, changes in work practices and attitudes at Anna Maria, Digital Federal Credit Union, and Fallon Health, and the potential long term affects to the field industrial psychology. This will also allow the audience to think about what an office looks like to them before to pandemic and after. This includes normalizing remote work, meetings, interviews, and how to improve balancing work and family life in this new normal.  

Reducing Medical Errors in a Hospital Setting: Nurse to Patient Ratios

By: Kayla McGrady

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This presentation will explore the problem of safe nurse to patient ratios to reduce errors in the healthcare setting. Many studies explore the effects on patient outcomes when different nurse to patient ratios are being implemented. Student Learning Outcomes that are related to practicing safe nurse to patient ratios are safety, patient centered care, evidence based practice, and quality improvement. This presentation will discuss what patient outcomes are affected when nurse to patient ratios are either too high or too low. Staffing ratios are focused on providing the safest care possible for the patient. It has been shown that safe care leads to lower medication errors, decreased fall risk, and more. These are different ways that nurse to patient ratios can be altered in order to improve patient outcomes and will be discussed further throughout this presentation.

The Impact of Residential Placement on Male Adolescents' Academic Progress

By: Will Mehigan

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Educational standards in the United States have been challenged and debated for many years, yet the results and issues remain the same. There is a population of youth that do not attend public schools, yet are affected by the inconsistency of education quality due to their vulnerable status. The youth that attend residential, foster, or group home placements are often overlooked when society discusses education because they are marginalized. To this end, this study is intended to find the relationship between a child’s placement and their education. The hypothesis is that any kind of placement will hinder a child’s educational progress. This study will focus on the adolescent, male population of a residential school facility. The secondary data from an agency related to the topic will be utilized. The presentation will be an oral one with a powerpoint accompaniment.

Diabetes and Pregnancy

By: Abbey Merow

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper explores the magnitude of the possible results of diabetes in pregnancy, if hyperglycemia is not controlled and prevented. Diabetes affects people of every gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. It is a medical condition so common that 1 in 11 patients are currently diagnosed (Melchior, 2017). In order to control and prevent the complications of hyperglycemia for mom and baby, regular exercise, proper use of medication, dietary control, and a general understanding of the disease must be incorporated into treatment.

Preventing Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in ICU

By: Christine Mitchell

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Pneumonia is the second most common nosocomial infection in the United States and the leading cause of death. Mechanical ventilation significantly increases the risk of bacterial pneumonia. Increasing drug resistance rates among gram-negative pathogens that lead to ventilator associated pneumonia have resulted in increased mortality, longer hospital stays, and high cost to the patients. 

Ventilator associated pneumonia is a serious problem. Aspiration, colonies of bacteria from the oropharynx, cross contamination from respiratory equipment, healthcare teams, leakage of contaminated secretions around the endotracheal tube, and the patients’ position all play an important role in the development of VAP. It is essential for nurses caring for ventilated critically ill patients to recognize the risk factors and include strategies for reducing these factors as part of their nursing care. This paper summarizes the importance of preventing VAP which include associated factors, current therapies, diagnosis, incidences, and with an emphasis on nursing implications in the care of these patients. There is urgent need for continued effective therapies to lessen the clinical and economic consequences of VAP. 

Increased Anxiety Surrounding the COVID-19 Pandemic

By: Griffin Moore and Javon Smith

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Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic it has been extremely difficult for individuals to adjust and adapt to the lifestyle of a pandemic. Anxiety effects mental health in many ways causing people to become fearful, angry, sad, and frustrated. In this presentation my partner and I aim to identify the reasons that anxiety has increased throughout the pandemic as well as different methods and techniques people can practice in order to improve stress and anxiety in their life. Stress and anxiety could stem from social distancing and not being able to see and interact with others in person. Along with loss of jobs, financial struggles, fear of contracting the virus itself, and uncertainty of when the pandemic will come to an end. The numerous processes to improve anxiety consists of taking care of yourself. For instance, getting enough sleep and making time for relaxation or personal activities. Another method to improving anxiety involves staying connected with family and friends via technology. One of the most important strategies to putting an end to anxiety regarding the pandemic is taking a break from the news and other social media platforms that can cause stress. Although it is good to stay connected within the news of the pandemic, it is good to take a pause because all of the news can cause stress and anxiety. This presentation will emphasize the fact that stress and anxiety has in fact escalated throughout the course of the Covid-19 pandemic although many people are unaware of this growing problem. 

Frontline Workers: Nurses During COVID

By: Sevignee Mugisha

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This past year, covid has tremendously impacted the lives of many people especially the frontline workers and their mental health. In the healthcare field, nurses are one of the biggest frontline workers, they are the ones who are in contact with a majority of people and have near experiences of what covid really is. With this we have to take in consideration how it affected these frontline workers physically but most importantly how it affected their mental health. The death, worry about families, supply shortage and the long hours without break can take a toll on these people and their mental health is what is most compromised. In my presentation I will be talking about how covid has affected nurses and their mental health during these troubling times.

Loneliness and Drug Use Disorder

By: Erlin Nelson

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Drug use disorders represents a common plague in American society. A high number of people are using a large volume of drugs due to loneliness in spite of its negative impact on their health. Most of the times, drug addiction causes psychological, emotional, and financial difficulties not only among the users but for people who are around them as well. Although the issue has been increasing dramatically in the past decades, few studies focused on the association between loneliness and substance abuse. To the end, this study examines the relationship between loneliness and substance users.It also examines the impact of substance disorder on individuals’ lives in comparison with individuals who remain sober. This study utilizes previously published articles to answer the questions.

The Role of Mothers and Fathers in the Career Development of College Seniors in the U.S.

By: Emily Ngo

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Parents of college-going emerging adults (broadly representing 18-29-year-olds) are a crucial support system as young people make plans and decisions in various life domains – work, love, and relationships (Arnett, 2015; Kazi & Akhlaq, 2017). This presentation discusses the role of parents in the career development of graduating college seniors. Specifically, the quality of the mother-emerging adult relationship and the father-emerging adult relationship were examined to understand their contributions to career confidence and career engagement of college seniors as they approach graduation and plan for their post-college transition. A total of 247 college seniors (Average age = 22 years, 70% female, 71% Caucasian) completed an online survey. Findings indicated that the quality of the mother-emerging adult relationship was rated higher than that of the father-emerging adult relationship. Further, a positive relationship between mother and emerging adults was related to career confidence and engagement, but in the current sample, the relationship between father and emerging adults was not related to career confidence or engagement. The implications of these findings will be discussed in the presentation. 

Relationship Between Spirituality and Depression

By: Magdalene Njuguna

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Spirituality is viewed and received differently among people who suffer a mental health problem, such as depression. According to previous literature, associated with spirituality, there are various reasons why the mental health of people get more or less affected than the others. These include, but not limited to their faith level, spiritual beliefs, spiritual history, and purpose of life. Also, individuals’ physical health and a lack of family and friends support act as a function to affect mental health conditions. In this regard, this study explores these risk factors for depression people who are religious compared to non-religious individuals. It also examines the impact of spirituality on depression among religious individuals compared to non-religious individuals. This study uses previously published peer-reviewed articles to explore the questions.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine

By: Serena Noinala

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper explores the different uses of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) that can be used for client care today. With the review of a variety of evidence-based literature published within the last five years and multiple different articles, this paper explains the use of CAM and how it can affect individuals with all sorts of pain. Pain is one of the most common complaints that many clients have during an everyday basis. Whether it is mouth pain, pain from a long-term disease, or even pain from just a simple migraine, everyone experiences pain at least once in their life. Rather than taking the pharmacological route, this paper focuses on the idea of CAM to relieve pain as an alternative option.

Addressing Elder Abuse

By: Priscilla Oti

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This paper explores the issue of elder abuse and how nurses can implement practices to recognize and reduce the occurrence of it. Many studies were done to identify features that contribute to elder abuse and what the nurse should be aware of. Due to the vulnerability the elderly have they should be protected and when in the nurses care should be advocated for. By gathering information from focus groups, surveys and interviews, researchers were able to narrow down the best evidence to support the issue of elder abuse. The nurses role in all of this is important. Just implementing a few things like client education, physical assessment and health history can lower the likelihood of elderly individuals being abused. Communication is key, whether it be to the patient, caregiver or to medical professionals about what to expect, getting the message out there will definitely bring awareness to the issue at hand. Many cases go unreported and hopefully we get to a point where patients feel comfortable with providers to speak up and seek a solution in future practice.

A Gentleman Needs No Introduction: How Robin Hood's Peasantry Leads to Chivalry

By: Audhinn Pelletier

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This presentation will cover the topic of how Robin Hood lives like a peasant but maintains the standards and values of a gentleman. When Robin Hood steals from the rich, he is actually stealing from corrupt organizations that act greedily to keep the peasants in the lower-class and keep the people in the upper-class rich. Looking at some of the first Robin Hood ballads allow for a look into where his peasantry originates from and looking at some of the plays and later ballads, allow insight into how his character slowly develops into having more gentleman-esque traits. A gentleman, of course, falls under a few different definitions which are applied to Robin hood in various different ways.

Robin Hood: The Noble Thief's Translation to Modern Media

By: Tyler Perron

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This presentation will discuss how Robin Hood has permeated oral tradition, ballads, and even modern movies. Heroes and heroic traits are directly shaped by societal and cultural values and this is exemplified by the different ways in which Robin Hood is depicted in Robin Hood: Men in Tights and several original Robin Hood ballads. The movie and the ballads show contrasts such as; the differing reasons that Robin Hood confronted the Sheriff, the use of corruption, and the formation of the Merry Men. These differences provide insight into how the heroic traits of these two characters were formed and why they were initiated in the first place.

Best Practice for Pain Management During End of Life Care

By: Julia Piscione

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Bases Research paper explores the best practice for providing end of life care. This paper focuses on the role of the nurse and the best practices available to provide care and comfort during this difficult time. Nurses can improve their pain assessment techniques in order to manage their patients pain more effectively. This paper discusses multiple ways in which to do this. There are pharmacological and nonpharmacological methods for controlling pain. Nurses are also able to work with their patients to identify and manage new symptoms as they arise. Using all of these methods, nurses can better manage their patients pain in order to make the process of death as easy for the patient and family as possible.

How To Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) at Home

By: Jadelia Quintana

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Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a recurring problem. This problem results in an infant’s death with no apparent cause for it. Multiple research studies have been conducted to determine what the best way is to prevent SIDS. Although there are different approaches for each study involved, they all have seemed to come to the same conclusion. It has been determined that more education is needed for parent/caregivers of newborn/infants. This education would mostly be provided by healthcare professionals. The parent/caregivers will need to be properly educated on the guidelines implemented by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). This education can occur throughout the pregnancy and also before discharge to home with a newborn. As a whole, it has been determined that parent/caregiver education plays a major role in the prevention of SIDS. 

Addiction in a Pandemic

By: Samantha Saad

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It’s no surprise that the events of the past year have been rough on the world. Mental health especially has deteriorated taken a toll on everyone, especially those with addiction and addictive personalities. New cases and worsening cases of addiction have been popping up left and right, with too many overdoses and deaths to count. Can this correspond to the pandemic directly? With everything being closed including harm reduction centers and addiction treatments, how could things have been done differently given the circumstances? 

Best Evidence-based Practice to Reduce Stress/Burnout in Oncology Nurses

By: Jessica Salles

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper researched the best evidence-based practice to reduce stress/burnout in oncology nurses. Peer-reviewed articles related to stress, burnout, and compassion fatigue for oncology nurses were used. These articles, no older than five years old, came from a variety of oncology nurses in North America. Burnout, stress, and compassion fatigue are among common trends within the oncology nursing field. Coping mechanisms and educational programs are used to decrease problems that arise from burnout in this particular field. A variety of research methods were analyzed and gathered to determine the best ways of coping for oncology nurses struggling with burnout. It was found that oncology nurses experience burnout related to emotional exhaustion, stress related to workload, and patient death and dying, as well as physical and emotional demands of the patient–nurse relationship. The effective methods that were found to positively impact coping were collaboration and teamwork, verbalizing, exercising, taking time for self, and the implementation of educational programs.

Steps to Help You Make an Easy Transition into Practicum

By: Bradley Sampson

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In this presentation, strategies for preparing yourself for entry into practicum and setting yourself up for a successful experience will be discussed. Topics will include:

  • How to get to know your host school
  • What to ask your supervising practitioner
  • How to balance seminar and practicum work
  • What current student teachers wish we knew

Comorbidity Between Mental Health and Addiction Treatment

By: Hailey Shaw

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Many national-level surveys have come to the conclusion that at least fifty percent of people with mental health disorders will develop a substance abuse issue. Most of the rates of substance use disorders have a high comorbidity with anxiety disorders among people. There are also drugs that may cause some mental health disorders. Drugs like cocaine, ketamine, LSD, marijuana, and methamphetamines are known to cause mental health disorders to come up later in life. In the US alone, from 1998-2018 over 750,000 people have died from a drug overdose. Most of the time, these overdoses were because people were trying to escape or get away from personal problems or even their own heads. Also, 30% of people will drop out of rehab in the first 3-6 months because they are not having their needs met in the right way. This is an important problem in the United States and it has been an ongoing battle for social workers everywhere, because the opioid and drug epidemic still has not ended. The objective of the study is to figure out if a new way to handle clients with co-occurring drug use and mental health disorders will be successful enough in a way that the amount of relapses after treatment could lessen. This study fulfills the objective using previously published secondary data from an agency with the agency’s approval.

Substance Abuse and Childhood Development

By: Erynn Sheehan

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Substance abuse and the effect it has on childhood development can be perceived in many different ways by the public in general. It can depend on their personal experience with substance use and their personal life trajectory. Although many factors can affect the child’s development disorder, this study examines whether substance abuse causes the disorder or not. To this end, this study will explore the association between the exposure to substance abuse during childhood and a developmental disorder as adults.

Nurse Fatigue

By: Karleen Shorette

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This evidenced based research paper is going to look at the best practice to reduce nurse fatigue that result in patient care errors. It is known that nursing is a very demanding occupation, which sometimes requires employees to work pressing hours. Most often, nurses may find themselves working 12-hour shifts, and when extra help is really needed, some may work 16. Working long hours without adequate rest can result in nurse fatigue and that can lead to patient errors that could have been avoided. When people start to work more than 8 hours, it can increase risks of injury to the nurse and the patient. Through this research, we look at the different reasons behind nurse fatigue and how it can be combated. The different researchers used surveys that included different tools to assess personal fatigue, and some surveys had open ended responses that allowed participants to discuss how they perceived their fatigue. Many of the participants included NICU, ICU, and med-surge nurses, varying from 20s to 60s and had many ranges of years of experience, as well as different levels of education (associates, baccalaureates, or doctorates). There were multiple themes that came up through their findings, including themes of managerial support (lack of), hours worked, rest before work, distressing patient events, and personal factors such as physiologic and mental health. Further research will include trying to change the limitations that the researchers had and other data collections methods other than surveys. 

Teenage Pregnancy Between 13-19 Years Old

By: Tamorah Stewart

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Teenage pregnancy, otherwise known as adolescent pregnancy, is one of the critical social issues nowadays. Research shows that teenage pregnancy is strongly associated with families with low income. Importantly, data showed that domestic violence are associated with teenage pregnancy as well. With a lack of education and knowledge about reproduction, these teens engage in unprotected and unsafe sexual activity. Peer pressure is another major cause of teenage pregnancy, often females may be pressured or forced by male peers to engage in sexual activity. Social media also has a large effect on teen pregnancy, especially projecting images such as “Teen Mom” and “16 and Pregnant”. In this regard, this research aims to examine the association between low income background, social media, and peer pressure and teenage pregnancy prevalence utilizing previously published articles.

Best Practice to Reduce the Incidence of Medication Errors

By: Madison Tashjian

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper explored the impact that medication errors have on medication administration in the clinical practice setting. A review of relevant evidence-based literature published with the last 5 years was conducted to identify best practices to address this significant clinical issue. The literature review revealed that medication errors are still prevalent in all health care settings. Medication errors can happen anytime medication administration occurs. Nurses are affected because they are considered the last line of defense to prevent a medication error during medication administration. Best practices to address decreasing the incidence of medication errors in nursing practice include following current guidelines that are already out there and adapting new guidelines such as implementing safety vests throughout healthcare facilities.

Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic in School Surrounding Special Needs Adolescence

By: Lacey Tomaiolo

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With this pandemic going on for a year now, it has affected people in so many ways, whether it’s family, school, work, etc., it’s been very hard I can say for myself. With this pandemic, one of the hardest things to do and adapt to is school now being remote learning, where I know I struggle badly as well with staying on track and being able to stay motivated. The difficulty is even more when it comes to special needs adolescence adapting to remote learning. Not having that in-person contact, their aid physically there with them, etc., is a lot for them to get used to and be engaged. Not only is this hard for them, but it can also be extremely hard for the parents or guardians of the special needs adult; adding a lot of stress, anxiety, work, etc., where those skills that the teachers and aids have and help with at school, parents aren’t fully capable of that. 

Child Trauma and Adult Anxiety Disorder

By: Rachael Tracy

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Research shows that the types and symptoms of childhood trauma vary depending on the types of trauma, the age of the child, and the child’s perception. The type of trauma that a child may experience falls under several categories including, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, and physical abuse. Literature shows that trauma affects the bodies’ natural way of processing new experiences by forcing the brain into a constant fight or flight mode. This phenomenon is due to increases in stress hormones released during the traumatic experience. Thus far, studies have shown that childhood trauma can lead to a number of mental health issues among adults including, adult anxiety disorder for aforementioned reasons. In this regard, this study examines the components of childhood trauma that contribute to adult anxiety disorder among adults. This study examines previous published articles to complete the purpose of the study. I will be presenting this proposal as a poster presentation.

Child Abuse and Poverty

By: Carmen Troncoso

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Child abuse remains one of the most critical problems in the United States. There are different ways in which abuse can be manifested. It could be done physically, emotionally, psychologically, and/or sexually. The form of abuse most experienced by children is neglect. Financially strained households lack resources to provide their children with the basic needs and it could be considered as child neglect. Data show that stress related to poverty among parents affect parenting skills and increase the risk of child abuse. For example, stressors, such as housing instability, food insecurity, delayed payments for bills, and not being able to meet the necessities of their children’s needs, are examples of parental stress that can lead to child maltreatment. In this regard, this study will examine the relationship between child abuse and poverty-related stress among parents. The results of the study may help public health officials to determine interventions and resources needed by the target population. This study utilizes previously published peer-reviewed articles to fulfill the objectives of the study.

The Effects of Prevention Programs on Early Onset of Substance Abuse in Adolescents

By: Sharon Vincent

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Substance use and abuse are one of the major public health problems, which is exacerbated by the early onset within adolescents. For this reason, the future health implications for adult life puts forth the need for prevention programs. This is particularly critical with populations and environments that create a significant risk for substance use. Statistics show that the earlier the onset, the more chance of development into substance use disorder which then leads to crime, low employment rates, and violence. The current data and statistics make it obvious for the importance of prevention programs for adolescents in order to reduce the negative consequences that will continue to occur in the future. In this regard, this study examines the effects of prevention programs which may prevent adolescents from early onset of substance use. The study also examines the effects of parent participation in the programs for the adolescents. This study aims to answer the questions using previously published literature.

Art and Other Alternative Therapies for Parkinson's Patients

By: Sophia Wackell

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This Clinical Practice Problem Evidence-Based Practice Paper will outline the importance of enforcing non-pharmacological alternative therapies for Parkinson’s patients in order to prolong the effectiveness of pharmacological medication interventions. A review has been conducted on a series of qualitative, quantitative, and meta-synthesis review studies surrounding this topic to collect the most recent, valuable, and evidence based clinical practices performed today. Parkinson’s pharmacological treatment is limited in long term effectiveness and the more alternative therapies we as Nurses can offer, can help push the need for medication therapy, or to allow it to work in adjunct to prolong therapy effectiveness and prevention of symptoms progression or development. These non-pharmacological therapy alternatives that can be offered aim to provide relief in not only areas of physical symptoms, but emotional as well. As Nurses, we are health educators to our patient’s, and being able to provide complementary and alternative therapies, stemmed from clinical evidence and research, empowers our ability to treat patient’s with a holistic approach addressing their physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual needs.  

Stress Among College Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By: Meaghan Walsh

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Throughout the past year, COVID-19 has caused significant physical, mental, emotional, financial, and social strain across the entire world. For vulnerable individuals, the pandemic has resulted in increased levels of anxiety, additional health concerns, and isolation. College students are facing all of these obstacles and have had to get used to remote learning in addition to the struggles discussed above. Students are often so busy between school, work, and other responsibilities that they neglect their mental health and forget to practice self-care. Based on the gaps identified in past research, this study’s research question is: what is the relationship between COVID-19 and college student’s stress? The hypothesis is that COVID-19 is related to an increased level of mental stress among college students. This quantitative study will examine how students at Anna Maria College are managing the added stress of the pandemic.

Habit Magazine Showcase

By: Dream Whitaker

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This presentation features pre-recorded readings of selected creative works from Habit Magazine contributors and editorial board. Habit Magazine is Anna Maria College’s only student-run literary magazine and club. It exists as a platform of free artistic expression for all students, faculty, staff, and alum.

Student Teaching in a Global Pandemic

By: Allison Woodward

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The purpose of this presentation is to inform my audience of the opportunities and also challenges that presented during my student-teaching experience during the 2020/2021 global pandemic. Reflecting on the past year, has my time in a virtual teaching setting positively shaped me as an educator? I discuss what I have learned from student engagement, SEL, technology, and making learning equitable in the new normal of online learning. Teaching through a new virtual setting has created an opportunity to look at what it means to be an educator, how to educate my students no matter the setting, and what will I carry through to my future career. 

Doll Therapy Approach to Alzheimer's Disease

By: Katie Zanauskas

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Alzheimer’s disease is a condition that many people suffer from that ends up disrupting their overall quality of life. The literature review focuses on dementia patients as they are introduced to the intervention of doll therapy. The review selected three articles all including the population of dementia patients, the intervention of doll therapy, and the overall findings to show the effects discovered. The studies were compared on how they were performed to find similarities and differences between the methods used, how the data was collected and finally the similarities within the findings. Overall, through these three studies, it was discovered that the intervention of doll therapy had a positive effect on the behaviors of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. 

Effects of Alcoholism on Children during the Pandemic

By: Emilee Zuidema

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There has been many things going on during the pandemic and many places that have shut down, but one of the places that didn’t was Liquor Stores. This gave the advantage of individuals to have a reason to drink during this period. Some may say alcoholics wouldn’t be affected during this time, but what we tend to forget is how it will affect their families more specifically the children. Since the shutdown of stores, schools, and work, families had to work from home causing tension in the house with being with each other all dayevery day. However, for some children, school was a way to get out of the house and take a break from their familiesespecially those who have alcoholic parent(s). Children are affected every day whether it be from physical abuse, verbal, assault, etc. Many children are not able to advocate for themselves due to their age and taking away their ability to go to school has caused them to stay at home more with their alcoholic parent(s). Not to mention their mental health declining as well and not being able to get the right services or being able to find a quiet area to talk to someone. During this time, children are facing the challenges of the pandemic, and being stuck at home. This presentation will explore how children are affected during the pandemic on alcoholism and how it affects their daily lives.